She Caught the Katy (And Left Me a Mule To Ride)

Henry Saint Clair Fredericks (born May 17, 1942), who uses the stage name Taj Mahal, is an American Grammy Award-winning blues musician. He often incorporates elements of world music into his works.

A self-taught singer-songwriter and film composer who plays the guitar, piano, banjo and harmonica (among many other instruments), Mahal has done much to reshape the definition and scope of blues music over the course of his almost 50-year career by fusing it with nontraditional forms, including sounds from the Caribbean, Africa and the South Pacific.

Taj Mahal leads with his thumb and middle finger when fingerpicking, rather than with his index finger as the majority of guitar players do. “I play with a flatpick,” he says, “when I do a lot of blues leads.” Early in his musical career Mahal studied the various styles of his favorite blues singers, including musicians like Jimmy Reed, Son House, Sleepy John Estes, Big Mama Thornton, Howlin’ Wolf, Mississippi John Hurt, and Sonny Terry. He describes his hanging out at clubs like Club 47 in Massachusetts and Ash Grove in Los Angeles as “basic building blocks in the development of his music.”

Taj Mahal playing – She Caught the Katy (And Left Me a Mule To Ride)

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“She Caught the Katy (And Left Me a Mule To Ride)” is a blues standard written by Taj Mahal and James Rachell. The song was first recorded for Taj Mahal’s 1968 album The Natch’l Blues, and is one of Mahal’s most famous tunes. It has since been covered many times, and is included on the soundtrack for the 1980 movie The Blues Brothers (the song greets Jake Blues as he leaves prison, in the beginning of the movie). According to John Belushi’s widow, it was Belushi’s favorite blues song. The “Katy” refers to the Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad.

Learn To Play Blues chord progression Taj Mahal

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She Caught the Katy (And Left Me a Mule To Ride) Lyrics

She caught the Katy, and left me a mule to ride
She caught the Katy, and left me a mule to ride
My baby caught the Katy, left me a mule to ride
The train pulled out, and I swung on behind
I’m crazy ’bout her, that hardheaded woman of mine

Man my baby’s long, great god she’s mighty, she’s tall
You know my baby’s long, great god she’s mighty, my baby she’s tall
Well my baby she’s long, my baby she’s tall
She sleeps with her head in the kitchen and her big feet out in the hall
And I’m still crazy ’bout her, that hardheaded woman of mine

Well I love my baby, she’s so fine
I wish she’d come and see me some time
If you don’t believe I love her, look what a hole I’m in
If you don’t believe I’m sinking, look what a shape I’m in

She caught the Katy, and left me a mule to ride
She caught the Katy, and left me a mule to ride
Well my baby caught the Katy, left me a mule to ride
The train pulled out, and I swung on behind
I’m crazy ’bout her, that hardheaded woman, hardheaded woman of mine

Some free Blues Guitar lessons that I have got a lot of useful Blues Guitar techniques from has been from Marty Schwartz Blues Guitar Lessons.

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Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

 

Posted on May 12, 2014

Deep River Blues Lesson – Doc Watson

Learn To Play Doc Watson – Deep River Blues

Arthel L. ”Doc” Watson was born on March 3, 1923 and died May 29, 2012 he was an American guitarist, into a family with a rich musical tradition. songwriter and singer of bluegrass, folk, country, blues and gospel music. Watson won seven Grammy awards as well as a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Watson’s flatpicking skills and knowledge of traditional American music are highly regarded.

Doc Watson – Deep River Blues Original Version

Click Here To Find Out More About Jim Bruce Blues Guitar Lessons

“Discovered” in the heat of the sixties folk revival, Doc Watson is a legendary performer who blends his traditional Appalachian folk music roots with blues, country, gospel, and bluegrass to create his unique style and expansive repertoire. Blind from infancy, Doc has spent his lifetime making music and is considered by fans everywhere one of the world’s most accomplished flat-pickers. By the time Watson reached adulthood, he had become a proficient acoustic and electric guitar player.

How To Play Deep River Blues

Click Here To Find Out More About Jim Bruce Blues Guitar Lessons

Doc Watson – Deep River Blues Lyrics

Let it rain, let it pour,
Let it rain a whole lot more,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues.
Let the rain drive right on,
Let the waves sweep along,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues.

My old gal’s a good old pal,
And she looks like a water fowl,
When I get them deep river blues.
Ain’t no one to cry for me,
And the fish all go out on a spree
When I get them deep river blues.

Give me back my old boat,
I’m gonna sail if she’ll float,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues,
I’m goin’ back to Muscle Shoals,
Times are better there I’m told,
Cause I got them deep river blues.

Let it rain, let it pour,
Let it rain a whole lot more,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues,
Let the rain drive right on,
Let the waves sweep along,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues.

If my boat sinks with me.
I’ll go down, don’t you see,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues,
Now I’m gonna say goodbye,
And if I sink, just let me die,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues.

Let it rain, let it pour,
Let it rain a whole lot more,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues,
Let the rain drive right on,
Let the waves sweep along,
‘Cause I got them deep river blues

Doc Watson was a formidable guitar player, mostly known as a country style flat picker – did you know he was also a fantastic finger picker? Find out how he did it.

Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

Posted on May 6, 2014

Jim Bruce Guitar Lessons Review

Jim Bruce – From Texas To The Delta – Acoustic Blues Guitar Lessons

When I first got into ragtime blues finger picking, there wasn’t much available in terms of videos showing you this. I learned by listening along with a few tabs from books. The thing that caught my attention was it looked like a genuine quality guitar course. This course is a breath of fresh air when compared to most of the guitar teaching material that you find on the Internet.

Jim Bruce Guitar Lessons Review

Overview of Jim Bruce’s ‘From Texas To The Delta Course’

Jim Bruce Ragtime and Blues Guitar Picking Course – From Texas to the Delta. presents a series of comprehensive video lessons with full guitar tab, which will teach you to play fingerstyle acoustic blues, ragtime and slide guitar, in the style of legendary bluesmen.

About Jim Bruce

Jim Bruce is a well established and respected guitarist in the acoustic blues & ragtime genre, having recorded several albums to date. He also spends a fair amount of time playing this style of guitar music on the streets and cafes of Europe, and so has years of practical experience in performing these blues songs.

Jim Bruce Blues Guitar Lessons – From Texas To The Delta video

Click Here To Find Out More About Jim Bruce Blues Guitar Lessons

A guitar course for learning how to play ragtime and blues finger style acoustic guitar. This isn’t something for the absolute beginner guitarist. Although this it not something for the complete beginner, if you are at an intermediate stage of guitar playing then you should be more than capable of playing acoustic ragtime blues. Playing acoustic fingerstyle ragtime / blues guitar is probably the most rewarding of all guitar styles I have ever learned to play. The fullness of sounding like two guitars playing together is something that’s hard to beat.

Although Jim offers a few tips in the videos, you are expected to know certain things like how to read guitar tab and are already familiar with the basic chords. Although this is called a guitar course, just be aware that it isn’t a course in the traditional sense; it’s more of a jump straight in approach. I personally think this is a good thing because most guitar courses waste half of the time telling you things you should already know.

Each video lesson in the course shows how to play blues guitar by presenting a complete song in a particular style, taking it section by section, then showing how to put those parts together.

In the relevant sections of the video, the guitar tab or chord/fingering charts are shown in the lower part of the screen, making it very easy to follow.

One thing that can seem difficult when you’re learning to play fingerpicking guitar, is coordinating the picking action from your right hand, with changing chords and fretting notes with the left. In each of the lesson videos, Jim shows closeups of both the right hand picking technique and the left hand chord positions, so you can see more easily what’s happening.

So what do you get?

The course is quite straightforward. It jumps straight in and shows you how to play a collection of 23 blues songs from blues guitarists such as Blind Blake, Robert Johnson and Big Bill Broonzy to name but a few. videos are in (wmv format), each one showing a complete fingerstyle song broken up and slowed down into sections showing right and left hand close ups. Jim also explains how each song is played along with tips where necessary. Each video is accompanied by a separate printable pdf TAB as well as the chord shapes and each tab section being displayed on screen in the video.

Each of the 23 songs are shown on video (wmv format), first at normal speed and then broken down into small sections, played slowly. The video also uses split screen for showing the left and right hands independently and displaying on screen Tabs and chord diagrams. All of the songs also come with a printable pdf file with the full guitar Tab.

There’s enough variety to cover the various blues picking styles ranging from the bouncy ragtime feel of Blind Blake to the more conventional blues style of Lightnin’ Hopkins and Floyd Council.

This course introduces acoustic guitar players to the world of blues finger picking guitar and focuses on the important basics that are vital for fast progression to more advanced patterns.

The seven videos presented feature discussions and slow demonstrations of the picking hand finger movements and include on-screen guitar tablature.

Video 1 – Should You Use Picks Or Bare Fingers?
Video 2 – Blues guitar – The Thumb Is KING!
Video 3 – Blues In E
Video 4 – Blues In A
Video 5 – Dropped D And open D Guitar Tunings
Video 6 – Open G Tuning And Bottleneck Guitar
Video 7 – On To Ragtime Guitar

Example Of Jim Bruce’s Teaching Style

The slide guitar lessons use an alternative guitar tuning, and Jim explains clearly how to change the tuning of each string, before you start the lesson itself. As with the other lessons, the guitar tab is shown in the lower section of the screen, pointing out where to use the slide.

With that in mind, you aren’t going to be given any baby steps in fingerpicking exercises that lead you progressively into more advanced techniques, you’re just going to go ahead and learn how to play the songs in any order you like. Ordinarily, I may think this kind of teaching is too fast, however, with fingerpicking the blues I think the hands on approach is better.

Click Here To Find Out More About Jim Bruce Blues Guitar Lessons

Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

Posted on May 6, 2014

I Can’t Quit You Baby By Otis Rush

“I Can’t Quit You Baby” is a blues standard written by Willie Dixon and first recorded by Chicago blues artist Otis Rush in 1956.

The song, a slow twelve-bar blues, has been recorded by various artists, including Led Zeppelin, who included it on their debut album.

Otis Rush revisited “I Can’t Quit You Baby” several times over the years, most notably when he recorded the song for the 1966 blues compilation Chicago|The Blues|Today! Vol. 2 (Vanguard 79217). This version featured an altered arrangement with an unusual turnaround (tonic chord followed by a half-step above the tonic chord) and staccato guitar fills.

This is the version on which most cover versions would be based.

Below is Otis Rush performing I Can’t Quit You Baby

I Can’t Quit You – Led Zeppelin cover (Otis Rush)

Click Here and you can get 10 Free Blues Guitar Video Lessons

Some free Blues Guitar lessons that I have got a lot of useful Blues Guitar techniques from has been from Marty Schwartz Blues Guitar Lessons.

Click here for GJ Secret Weapon to Blues Domination 10 DVD Set


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I Can’t Quit You – Led Zeppelin Lyrics

“I Can’t Quit You Baby”

I can’t quit you babe

Woman I think I’m gonna put you down for a little while

I can’t quit you babe

I… think I’m gonna put you down for a while

I said you messed up my happy home

Made me mistreat my only child

You built my hopes so high

Baby then you let me down so low

You built my hopes so high then ya let me down… so low

Don’tcha realize sweet baby?

Woman I don’t know… which way to go

Woman I can’t quit you babe

I think I’m gonna put you down for a while

Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

Posted on May 1, 2014

Learn To Play Jolene by Dolly Parton

Dolly Rebecca Parton is an American singer-songwriter. Parton issued a few modestly successful singles from 1959 through the mid-1960s, showcasing her distinctive soprano voice.

“Jolene” is a song written and performed by Dolly Parton. It was released in October 1973 as the first single and title track from her album Jolene, produced by Bob Ferguson.

“Jolene” tells the tale of a woman confronting Jolene, a stunningly beautiful woman, who she believes is trying to steal away her man and begging her to “please don’t take her man”. Throughout the song, the woman implores Jolene “please don’t take him just because you can”. The song became Parton’s second solo number-one single on the country charts after being released as a single in late 1973 (prior to the album’s release).

It reached the top position in February 1974; it was also a moderate pop hit for her and a minor adult contemporary chart entry, and was released as a single in the UK the following year, where it reached number seven in the UK singles chart.

Jolene by Dolly Parton

Learn “Jolene” by Dolly Parton

Marty Schwartz shows how you play “Jolene” by Dolly Parton

To get more lessons on how to play easy beginner country songs on guitar Click Here

“Jolene” By Dolly Parton Lyrics

Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
I’m begging of you please don’t take my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him just because you can
Your beauty is beyond compare
With flaming locks of auburn hair
With ivory skin and eyes of emerald green

Your smile is like a breath of spring
Your voice is soft like summer rain
And I cannot compete with you, Jolene

He talks about you in his sleep
There’s nothing I can do to keep
From crying when he calls your name, Jolene

And I can easily understand
How you could easily take my man
But you don’t know what he means to me, Jolene

Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
I’m begging of you please don’t take my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him just because you can

You could have your choice of men
But I could never love again
He’s the only one for me, Jolene

I had to have this talk with you
My happiness depends on you
And whatever you decide to do, Jolene

Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
I’m begging of you please don’t take my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him even though you can
Jolene, Jolene

To get more lessons on how to play easy beginner country songs on guitar Click Here

Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

Posted on May 1, 2014

Learn to Play Blue Suede Shoes By Carl Perkins

Learn To Play Blue Suede Shoes – Carl Perkins

Carl Perkins was an American rockabilly musician who recorded most notably at Sun Records Studio in Memphis, Tennessee, beginning in 1954. His best known song is “Blue Suede Shoes”.

Called “the King of Rockabilly”, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll, the Rockabilly, and the Nashville Songwriters Halls of Fame; and was a Grammy Hall of Fame Award recipient.

Perkins and his brother Jay had their first paying job (in tips) as entertainers at the Cotton Boll tavern on Highway 45 some twelve miles south of Jackson, starting on Wednesday nights during late 1946. Carl was only 14 years old. One of the songs they played was an uptempo, country blues shuffle version of Bill Monroe’s “Blue Moon of Kentucky”. Within a month Carl and Jay began playing Friday and Saturday nights at the Sand Ditch tavern near the western boundary of Jackson.

During the next couple of years the Perkins Brothers began playing other taverns, including El Rancho, The Roadside Inn, and the Hilltop around Bemis and Jackson as they became well known. Carl persuaded his brother Clayton to play the bass fiddle to complete the sound of the band.

Perkins began performing regularly on WTJS-AM in Jackson during the late 1940s as a sometime member of the Tennessee Ramblers. He also appeared on Hayloft Frolic where he performed two songs, sometimes including “Talking Blues” as done by Robert Lunn on the Grand Ole Opry. Perkins and then his brothers began appearing on The Early Morning Farm and Home Hour. Overwhelmingly positive listener response resulted in a 15-minute segment sponsored by Mother’s Best Flour. By the end of the 1940s, the Perkins Brothers were the best-known band in the Jackson area.

Perkins had day jobs during most of these early years, working first at picking cotton, then at Day’s Dairy in Malesus, then at a mattress factory and in a battery plant. He then worked as a pan greaser for the Colonial Baking Company from 1951 through 1952.

Perkins successfully auditioned for Sam Phillips at Sun Records during early October 1954. Perkins was booked to appear along with Elvis Presley at theaters in Marianna and West Memphis, Arkansas. Commenting on the audience reaction to both Presley and himself Perkins said, “When I’d jump around they’d scream some, but they were gettin’ ready for him. It was like TNT, man, it just exploded. All of a sudden the world was wrapped up in rock.

Commenting on Perkins’s playing, Sam Phillips has been quoted as saying that, “I knew that Carl could rock and in fact he told me right from the start that he had been playing that music before Elvis came out on record … I wanted to see whether this was someone who could revolutionize the country end of the business.”

“Blue Suede Shoes” is a rock and roll standard written and first recorded by Carl Perkins in 1955 and is considered one of the first rockabilly (rock and roll) records and incorporated elements of blues, country and pop music of the time. Perkins’ original version of the song was on the Cashbox Best Selling Singles list for 16 weeks, and spent 2 weeks in the No. 2 position.[2] Elvis Presley performed his version of the song three different times on national television.

The Sun recording of “Blue Suede Shoes” was released on January 1, 1956, as Sun 234. Two copies of the song on 78 rpm records were sent to Perkins, but arrived broken. Carl soon discovered that the song was available in the newer 7″ microgrooved 45 rpm format and was disappointed that he didn’t have a copy in the older, more substantial 78 rpm format.

Blue suede shoes were a luxury item in the South, a stylish footwear for a night out. You had to be careful with them, however, since suede isn’t easy to clean.

Perkins never owned a pair, but Johnny Cash told him a story about someone who did. As Cash told it, he and Perkins were performing at a show in Amory, Mississippi along with Elvis Presley. When Presley was on stage, Cash told Perkins a story from his days serving in the Air Force in Germany. Cash’s sergeant, a black guy named C.V. White, would wear his military best when he was allowed off base, and at one point said to Johnny, “don’t step on my blue suede shoes.” The shoes were really just Air Force-issued black, but white would say, “Tonight they’re blue suede.”

The story Perkins told is that later on, he was playing at a high school sorority dance when he came across a guy who wasn’t paying much attention to his date, but kept telling everyone not to stop on his “suedes,” meaning his blues suede shoes. At 3:00 a.m. that night, Perkins woke up and wrote the lyrics based on what happened that night and the story he heard from Cash. He couldn’t find any paper, so he wrote it on a potato sack.

Carl Perkins Playing Blues Suede Shoes

How To Play Blue Suede Shoes – Carl Perkins

Learn Some Easy Acoustic Songs Click Here

Carl Perkins – Blues Suede Shoes Lyrics

Three to get ready now go cat go
But don’t you, step on my blue suede shoes
You Can do anything
But lay off of my blue suede shoes

You can knock me down, step on my face
Slander my name all over the place
Do anything that you wanna do
But uh uh honey lay off of my shoes
You can do anything
But lay off of my blue suede shoes

You can burn my house, you can steal my car
Drink my liquor from an old fruit jar
Do anything that you wanna do
But uh uh honey lay off of my shoes
But don’t you, step on my blue suede shoes
Well, you can do anything
But lay off of my blue suede shoes

Well, it’s one for the money, two for the show
Three to get ready, now go cat go
But don’t you, step on my blue suede shoes
You can do anything
But lay off of my blue suede shoes

Well, it’s blue, blue, blue suede shoes
Blue, blue, blue suede shoes, yeh
Well, blue, blue, blue suede shoes
Blue, blue, blue suede shoes
Well, you can do anything
But lay off of my blue suede shoes

Learn Some Easy Acoustic Songs Click Here

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Posted on May 1, 2014

Learn To Play Life by The Drop By Stevie Ray Vaughan

Learn To Play “Life by The Drop” – Stevie Ray Vaughan

Born and raised in Dallas, Vaughan began playing guitar at age 7, inspired by older brother Jimmie. By age 12 he was playing in garage bands, and within a few years he joined semi-professional bands that occasionally landed gigs in local nightclubs. At 17 he dropped out of high school to concentrate on playing music.

In 1970 Stevie Ray Vaughan was playing in a nine-piece horn band and then formed his first blues band, Blackbird, a year later. Blackbird moved to Austin and after a few more stints in various bands Vaughan joined Paul Ray and the Cobras in 1975. The Cobras were Austin’s Band of the Year in 1976. After paying his dues as a sideman Stevie formed Triple Threat Revue in 1977. Triple Threat also featured bassist W.C. Clark, and vocalist Lou Ann Barton.

Barton left the band in 1979 and the group became Double Trouble, the name inspired by the Otis Rush song. Double Trouble featured Jack Newhouse on bass, Chris Layton on drums and Vaughan became the band’s lead singer. In 1981 Tommy Shannon joined on bass and the power trio was set.

The Stevie Ray Vaughan Official Website

Stevie Ray Vaughan developed a uniquely eclectic and fiery style that sounded like no other guitarist, regardless of genre. Vaughan bridged the gap between blues and rock like no other artist had since the late ’60s.

Stevie Ray Vaughan was inspired musically by American and British blues rock. He favored clean amplifiers with high volume and contributed to the popularity of vintage musical equipment. He often combined several different amplifiers together and used minimal effects pedals.

From 1983 to 1990 Stevie Ray Vaughan was the leading light in American blues, consistently selling out concerts while his albums regularly went gold. His tragic death in 1990 at age 35 cut short a brilliant career in blues and American rock & roll just as he was on the brink of superstardom.

The product of the natural sound of amps with ample clean headroom. However, Stevie Ray Vaughan occasionally used pedals to augment his sound, mainly to boost the signal, although he occasionally employed a rotating speaker cabinet and wah pedals for added textural flair.

“Life by the Drop”, a song written by Stevie Ray Vaughan’s friend Doyle Bramhall and played on a twelve-string acoustic guitar. This song is not about Vaughan’s struggle with drug abuse, as many think, but actually about Vaughan’s friendship with Doyle Bramhall from Bramhall’s perspective.

Life by The Drop- Stevie Ray Vaughan

How to play life by the drop – Stevie Ray Vaughan

Marty Schwartz from GuitarJamz showing you how to play life by the drop – Stevie Ray Vaughan

Check out the Marty Schwartz GJ Acoustic Blues 5 DVD Set + 10 Jamtracks just Click Here

Stevie Ray Vaughan – Life By The Drop Lyrics

Hello there, my old friend
Not so long ago it was til the end
We played outside in the pouring rain
On our way up the road we started over again

You’re living our dream oh you on top
my mind is aching,’ Lord it won’t stop
That’s how it happens living life by the drop

Up and down the road in our worn down shoes
Talking about good things and singing the blues
you went your way and I stayed behind
We both knew it was just a matter of time

You’re living our dream oh you on top
my mind is aching,’ Lord it won’t stop
That’s how it happens living life by the drop

No wasted time, we’re alive today
Churning up the past, there’s no easier way
Time’s been between us, a means to an end
God it’s good to be here walking together my friend

We’re living our dreams
my mind’s stopped aching,’
That’s how it happened living life by the drop
That’s how it happened living life by the drop
That’s how it happened living life by the drop

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Also check out the Marty Schwartz GJ Acoustic Blues 5 DVD Set + 10 Jamtracks just Click Here

Enjoy and to your Blues Guitar Success.

Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

Posted on May 1, 2014

Johnny Winter – Rock Me Baby Lesson

Johnny Winter — is an American blues guitarist, singer, and producer. Best known for his high-energy blues-rock albums and live performances in the late 1960s and ’70s, Winter also produced three Grammy Award-winning albums for blues legend Muddy Waters.

Since his time with Waters, Winter has recorded several Grammy-nominated blues albums and continues to tour extensively.

Johnny Winter has been a guitar hero without equal. Signing to Columbia records in 1969 called largest solo artist deal of it’s time, Johnny immediately laid out the blueprint for his fresh take on classic blues a prime combination for the legions of fans just discovering the blues via the likes of Jimmy Page and Eric Clapton.

Constantly shifting between simple country blues in the vein of Robert Johnson, to all-out electric slide guitar blues-rock, Johnny has always been one of the most respected singers and guitar players in rock and the clear link between British blues-rock and American Southern rock.

Johnny Winter’s version of Rock Me Baby

The Johnny Winter Official Website

“Rock Me Baby” is a blues standard that has become one of the most recorded blues songs of all time. When B.B. King’s recording of “Rock Me Baby” was released in 1964, it became his first Top 40 hit. It is based on earlier blues songs and has been interpreted and recorded by numerous artists in a variety of styles.

B.B. King’s “Rock Me Baby” is based on “Rockin’ and Rollin’”, a song recorded by Lil’ Son Jackson in 1950 (Imperial 5113). King’s lyrics are nearly identical to Jackson’s, although instrumentally the songs are different. “Rockin’ and Rollin’” is a solo piece, with Jackson’s vocal and guitar accompaniment, whereas “Rock Me Baby” is an ensemble piece.

BB King’s Version of Rock Me Baby

How to play Johnny Winter’s Rock Me Baby

Johnny Winter’s Guitar Style Lesson

Johnny Winter – Rock Me Baby Lyrics

Oh, rock me, hey
Yeah
Rock me, baby, rock me all night long
Rock me all night long
Rock me, baby, rock me all night long
Want you to rock me like my back ain’t got no bone
Roll me, mama like a wagon wheel
Roll me, baby like you roll a wagon wheel
Rock ‘n’ roll, mama
Won’t you rock me, mama?
Know how it could have made me feel
Rock me, baby, rock me slow
Rock me on till I can’t rock no more
Rock me, baby, rock me all night long, hoo
Once you rock me like my back ain’t got no bone
Yeah, rock me
Yeah,
Rock me, mama, rock me slow
Rock me, baby, till I can rock no more
Rock me, baby, rock me all night long
Rock me all night long
Want you to rock me, baby, like my back ain’t got no bone
Yeah

Click Here and you can get 10 Free Blues Guitar Video Lessons

Some free Blues Guitar lessons that I have got a lot of useful Blues Guitar techniques from has been from Marty Schwartz Blues Guitar Lessons.

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Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

Posted on April 25, 2014

How to Sing and Play Guitar at the Same Time

As with many aspects of music, singing and playing guitar at the same time takes practice. Singing and playing guitar can be tricky for a beginner but it is not impossible. A sense of good timing, rhythm and ability to combine two actions at once will come with practice and dedication.

Marty Schwartz GJ Acoustic Blues 5 DVD Set + 10 Jamtracks just Click Here

How to Sing and Play Guitar at the Same Time


You must have the ability to play rhythms accurately. This includes having a consistent approach to strumming, usually with your right hand constantly moving down and up regardless of when you strike the strings.

So how do you develop this skill?

It’s all about AUTOMATION. Remember how hard it was changing gears when you learned to drive?

If you are still looking at your chord changes or strumming hand, you are probably not ready.

When learning a song, play it to the point that you can have a light conversation with someone else and still keep the rhythm. You have to train your brain not to think about the guitar chords you are playing.

PICK AN EASY SONG FIRST and Learn songs that were meant to be sung and played at the same time, such as singer-songwriter songs or praise songs. Praise songs are particularly good for this exercise because they are meant to be simple so the masses can sing them.

Simple chords, simple melodies and very memorable. Write out the lyrics and study them. Listen to the song 10 times in a row, and really focus on it. Try to ABSORB it. For some reason headphones seem to work best for focused listening. playing along and singing with the original recording will help you with timing.

Know the song you are playing.

Slow the song down and know the syllables when the chords change. Not just what word, but which syllable within a word the chords change on. The speed will come once you’ve got all of the above working correctly.


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Also check out the Marty Schwartz GJ Acoustic Blues 5 DVD Set + 10 Jamtracks just Click Here

Enjoy and to your Blues Guitar Success.

Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

Posted on April 23, 2014

Blue on Black – Kenny Wayne Shepherd

“Blue on Black” is a song by American blues band Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band and is the lead single from their second studio album, Trouble Is…. Noah Hunt, a Cincinnati, Ohio native and Shepherd collaborator, is the lead singer. Released on April 7, 1997, the track rose to No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart and remained there for 6 non-consecutive weeks. “Blue on Black” was regarded as the best rock song of 1998 by various media, and its popularity helped make Trouble Is… the 1999 Blues Album of the Year in Billboard.

Guitar Lessons – How to Play “Blue on Black” – Kenny Wayne Shepherd

Kenny Wayne Shepherd inspired Blues Rock guitar lesson soloing tone gear licks Blue on Black style

Next Level Guitar Click Here

Kenny Wayne Shepherd – Blue on Black Lyrics

Nite falls , and im alone
Skin, yeah chilled me to the bone
You, turned and you ran,
Oh yeah,
Oh slipped, right from my hand

Hey
Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
A dead mans touch
Wisper on a scream
Doesnt’t’t change a thing
Don’t bring you back
Blue on black
Oh yeah, blue on black

Blind, oh, now i see
Truth, lies, and in between
Wrong, can’t be undone
Oh slipped, from the tip of
Your tounge

Hey
Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
A dead mans touch
Wisper on a scream
Doesnt’t’t change a thing
Doesnt’t’t bring you back, yeah
Blue on black
Oh, blue on black
Oh, yeah

(solo)

Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
Is a dead mans touch
Wisper on a scream
Doesnt’t’t change a thing
Don’t bring you back
Blue on black
Oh yeah, blue on black

Hey
Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
Is a dead mans touch
Wisper on a scream
Doesnt’t’t change a thing
Doesnt’t’t bring you back
Blue on black
Oh, blue on black
Oh wha oh, blue on black
Oh, blue on black

Click Here and you can get 10 Free Blues Guitar Video Lessons

Some free Blues Guitar lessons that I have got a lot of useful Blues Guitar techniques from has been from Marty Schwartz Blues Guitar Lessons.

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Disclosure: You should assume that the owner of this website is an affiliate for providers of goods and services mentioned on this website. The owner may be compensated when you purchase after clicking on a link. The owner may also have received the product for free. Perform due diligence before purchasing from this or any other website.

 

Posted on April 16, 2014